The long, thin jaw of the gharial may appear quite frightening to many folks, but have no fear — it's an adaptation developed in response to the creature's fish-heavy diet. Sadly, the global population numbers for this critically endangered Indian crocodile are currently estimated at less than 235 individuals, due to loss of river habitat, depletion of food sources and fishing nets.
The daintily named sea pig is actually a kind of locally abundant sea cucumber that inhabits the world’s abyssal plains up to 3.7 miles beneath the surface. It gets its name from a characteristic pink, eggplant-shaped body and bloated legs that give it a porcine appearance. Like their shallower cucumber cousins, sea pigs play an important role in marine ecosystems. They feed on detritus that falls to the seafloor from the rich waters above, whether plankton or a whale carcass. They walk along on a few large tube feet, using a combination of muscle contractions and body fluids. Modified pairs of legs can act as antennae to detect food.
Hagfish are primitive marine creatures that live deep at the bottom of the ocean. They look a bit like an eel and have no jaws, spines or scales and have exceedingly poor eyesight; most rely on their sense of smell. Over 60 different species of hagfish are known which can vary in color from pinks, browns or greys. They often scavenge off dead animals, but they can also latch onto passing live prey, burrowing inside and eating their way out. Grim. One of the most interesting features of hagfish is their ability to produce a slime that can suffocate predators such as sharks. Just a tiny amount of slime will dramatically expand in size when it comes into contact with seawater, and sometimes the hagfish themselves can get tangled up but they wriggle into knots to escape from it.
After just moving into a new house in England, Michelle Widwinter went outside to take a quick picture of home sweet home. It wasn't until Michelle looked back at the pic later that she noticed a face staring through the downstairs window. When she posted the picture online, a local historian, Andrew Jones, determined that the man in the photo could have been the apparition of "Old Man Kent," who was a suspect in a famous murder case in 1860. As a non-ghost believer, Michelle initially thought it was nothing more than a reflection of the flower bush in her front yard. But after seeing the picture, hearing weird noises coming from the walls, and seeing her lights flicker, she couldn't help but wonder if it was, in fact, the face of the man.
"There is nothing sweeter than having a family or friend weekend at the lake. Warm weather, fun in the water, games, and of course fails. Some of the funniest fails happen at the lake. Fishing fails, water skiing fails, water tubing fails, rope swinging fails, puppy fails, and much much more. nnHere are my favorite fails in this hilarious compilation: nn1. the two puppies who swim toward a stick in the lake and fight over it while swimming back to land. nn2. the guy who is water skiing with his dog nn3. the woman who is riding her horse in the lake... until the horse gets too excited and she ends up falling off. nn4. the guys who ride their canoe down a sand dune and into a lake... not a huge fail here but it looks like a lot of fun!!nn5. the grandma and grandson fishing duo! Grandma is ready to cast her fishing line out into the lake but ends up smacking her grandson across the face!! nnWhich clip was your favorite? Share in the comment section below!"
Evolution, I just have a few questions. And they all have to do with why this fish looks oddly like my Grandpa Tom. Also, who was so lazy that they decided on ‘blobfish’? Honestly, I could write an entire book of questions, but for now, I’ll just admire the laziness of the blobfish, who doesn’t work for food and rather just inhales whatever floats by that looks generally edible (yes––that’s true).
To celebrate their first year in university, six friends went camping in the wilderness. After driving for several hours from the nearest town, they discovered a lagoon, nestled beside a cliff ideal for diving. They set up camp in the woods nearby and spent the evening swimming in the warm, clear water. As the sun sunk below the trees, one of the friends went up to the highest point on the cliff and jumped off, while the other 5 watched. Their laughter slowly subsided as they waited for him to surface. It only took half a minute for them to dive in after their friend. Struggling and sputtering among the reeds in the lagoon, they searched hopelessly for him. Finally they disentangled themselves and came up, but they never saw their friend again. Heartbroken they returned to the city and passed a strange and lonely year in which their only solace was the knowledge that they would return to the lagoon to honor the anniversary of their friend’s death.
In a photo provided by Stephen Tatum, an orange alligator is seen near a pond in Hanahan, S.C. Photos show the 4- to 5-foot-long alligator on the banks of a retention pond at the Tanner Plantation neighborhood. While no one knows exactly why this alligator is orange, Jay Butfiloski with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources says the color may come from where the animal spent the winter, perhaps in a rusty steel culvert pipe. Experts say the alligator will shed its skin and probably return to a normal shade soon. 

Blobfish, pangolin, and flower mantis are just a few of the names of the bizarre bugs and animals that readers will learn about in this fascinating nonfiction title. Through vibrant images and photos, informational text, a glossary of terms, and an index, readers will learn some of the strange ways that arthropods, invertebrates, and mammals have adapted over time to camouflage themselves and develop interesting ways to keep predators away.
I always beg for them to give him one last chance. Of course, they did at first. Charlie has been back home several times, each shorter in duration than the last. Every time without fail, it all starts again. The neighbourhood cats with gouged out eyes showing up in his toy chest, my dad’s razors found dropped on the baby slide in the park across the street, mom’s vitamins replaced by bits of dishwasher tablets. My parents are hesitant now, using “last chances” sparingly. They say his disorder makes him charming, makes it easy for him to fake normalcy, and to trick the doctors who care for him into thinking he is ready for rehabilitation. That I will just have to put up with my boredom if it means staying safe from him.
It’s been nearly a decade since it was first uploaded, but “I Feel Fantastic” is still only a little less mysterious than when it first captured the attention of the internet. The featured robot, Tara the Android, is the creation of an robot hobbyist who calls himself "John Bergeron." The plan was for Tara to be the first android pop star, but the bizarre description on the YouTube upload that references Pygmalion and a cutaway from I Feel Fantastic to an outdoor location gave birth to several online urban legends. Is Tara a harmless pop star, or a robot built in the image of a murder victim?

Watch through Blair Witch vision as some poor soul gets hopelessly lost in the subterranean stone tunnels of the Paris catacombs, and listen to him get more frightened as he speeds up his winding path (like he's being chased?) before the camera cuts out (was it dropped?). Then we hear the man either run off or get sucked into the spirit world. You watch and decide... if you're not claustrophobic, that is.

The Saiga antelope can be found around Russia, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan and is easily recognized thanks to its large and flexible nose. In reality, its gigantic schnoz helps to filter out dust and regulate its blood temperature. In May 2015, more than 120,000 Saiga antelope were found dead. Scientists believe they were victims of a suspected epizootic illness that infected the herd.
Hosted by the Illinois Paranormal Research Association, Believe operates on a weekly basis, with the crew traveling the country, documenting every demonic disembodied voice and shadowy figure along the way. Led by David Scott, these paranormal investigators have made it their mission to separate the haunted from the not-so-haunted, using innovative investigation techniques to capture both visual and audio evidence while visiting everything from haunted hotels to mental health hospitals. 

The yeti crab (Kiwa hirsuta), an unusual, hairy crab with no eyes, was discovered in 2005 on a hydrothermal vent near Easter Island. This decapod, which is approximately 15 cm long, is notable for the quantity of silky blond setae (resembling fur) covering its pereiopods (thoracic legs, including claws). Its discoverers dubbed it the “yeti lobster” or “yeti crab”.
You probably recognize these two from television. Ghost Hunters airs Wednesdays on Syfy; Ghost Adventures, Saturdays on the Travel Channel. But their YouTube channels are worth checking out for your streaming scares. Their YouTube channels are great ways to revisit past investigations, even sometimes including silly behind the scenes extras and fan interactions. 
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