One of the classic, creepy videos of the pre-YouTube  internet made it to the mass streaming service in 2006. Rather than being downloaded and shared as a movie file as it originally gained cult status, the video was uploaded by the director of the short film, who already knew it had become a curio of the web. The director, David B. Earle, wanted to make an infinitely looping film to show the paradox that there might be nothing on the other side of life.
The blackness of our deepest oceans is a tough place to eke out a living. To survive, residents must make the most of feeding opportunities when they arise. The black swallower is ruled by its stomach: It can eat fishes twice its own length and 10 times its mass. However, its eyes can be bigger than its stomach. Many of the known specimens have been found when a bloated swallower washed ashore having eaten a meal too large to digest.

Though this isn't an *official* ghost sighting, back in 2013 21-year-old Elisa Lam went missing on vacation in Los Angeles. Her body was found in a water tank in a downtown L.A. hotel, and this was the last footage of her seen before she disappeared. (Oh, and still nobody knows how the body got there.) We have to wonder what Lam was *really* seeing in her final moments...
Hagfish are primitive marine creatures that live deep at the bottom of the ocean. They look a bit like an eel and have no jaws, spines or scales and have exceedingly poor eyesight; most rely on their sense of smell. Over 60 different species of hagfish are known which can vary in color from pinks, browns or greys. They often scavenge off dead animals, but they can also latch onto passing live prey, burrowing inside and eating their way out. Grim. One of the most interesting features of hagfish is their ability to produce a slime that can suffocate predators such as sharks. Just a tiny amount of slime will dramatically expand in size when it comes into contact with seawater, and sometimes the hagfish themselves can get tangled up but they wriggle into knots to escape from it.

Just as the Cleveland Museum of Art was preparing for the special Monet exhibit Painting The Modern Garden: From Monet to Matisse, the museum's director of architecture and design snapped this spooky photo of a mysterious figure looking down on the gallery. The "ghost" had an uncanny resemblance to the French Impressionist painter himself, and Kelly Notaro, communications associate for the museum told TODAY that "this snapshot taken by a staff member is not retouched or photoshopped, and we've heard from others that they've seen the man." Talk about a unique way to launch an exhibit.

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