All madness aside, what really made the Stanley Hotel famous was when author Stephen King actually lived at the hotel for a time and had his own ghostly experience. King reported seeing a faint ghostly figure at the top of the stairs one night before bed. It was this mysterious sighting he witnessed, that inspired King’s movie The Shining. The hotel now runs the film version of “The Shining” on a continuous loop to the guest televisions.
Discovered in 800 feet of water off the Philippines, the terrible claw lobster is a translucent pinkish-white crustacean measuring an inch in length. Just as dinosaur means terrible lizard, the scientific name of this lobster, Dinochelus, means terrible claw. The inside surface of this lobster’s claws are lined with long, spinelike teeth, the function of which is likely related to feeding or anti-predation.
If you freeze-frame it, you can see that while the thing may be humanoid in appearance, its eyes are badly sunken in, its head and face seem overly large (and awfully pale), and its pupils catch every ounce of the virtually nonexistent light coming from the camera. So, it's either a seriously haggard meth addict with Riddick-like powers who wandered out into the woods of Spain to scream at the talking scorpions living beneath his fingernails, or it's someone in heavy monster makeup. Most likely, it's the latter and the whole thing was staged by a couple of friends wanting to either get on the news or become Internet famous. It's not even that great of a costu- ... wait, what are those, stumps on its back?
Despite its ferocious demeanor, the fangtooth measures a little more than 6 inches in length as an adult. Juveniles and adults look so much different that in the 1800s they were thought to be distinct species. Juveniles are found as shallow as 150 feet, migrating into the depths as they mature. It is believed that males are parasitic of females and attach permanently onto them to fertilize the eggs.
The Angora rabbit is an animal that seems to have an eternally bad hair day. One of oldest types of rabbit in the world, it’s bred for its long, soft, silky hair. This is a very high maintenance animal since it needs to be sheared every few months. Apparently, their long fur can cause these rabbits to sometimes overheat. And we all know there’s nothing worse than having a rabbit melt on your carpet.
“The babirusas (from Indonesian b?b? r?sa, lit. “deer-hog”) are a genus, Babyrousa, in the pig family (Suidae) found in Wallacea, or specifically the Indonesian islands of Sulawesi, Togian, Sula and Buru. All members of this genus were considered part of a single species until 2002, the babirusa, B. babyrussa, but following the split into several species, this scientific name is restricted to the Buru babirusa from Buru and Sula, whereas the best-known species, the north Sulawesi babirusa, is named B. celebensis. If a babirusa does not grind its tusks (achievable through regular activity), they will eventually keep growing so as to penetrate the animal’s own skull.” – Syahrul Ramadan
It’s the most wonderful time of the year: Halloween! And the only thing more fun than celebrating with a "sexy [insert inanimate object here]" costume and downing candy corn shots is not doing that and instead downing something pumpkin-flavored under a pile of blankets while watching some truly terrifying content. If you’re stuck for ideas, here are 13 of our favorite (read: scariest) classic ghost movies guaranteed to keep you up all night thinking, What was that? Did you hear that?! TURN THE LIGHTS ON.
This grotesque looking creature is the Aye- Aye, native to the island of Madagascar. These creatures are nocturnal i.e. they only come out at night. Aye-ayes spend their lives in rain forest trees and avoid coming down to earth. They have long witch-like fingers that help them grab small insects and grubs from tree trunks. These animals may not look like primates at first, but they are related to chimpanzees, apes, and even humans. Many locals regard the aye -aye as an omen of ill luck. For this reason they have often been killed on sight. Such hunting has made the aye-aye critically endangered, but thankfully they are protected by law.
A self-described ghost hunter from Texas who has worked with dozen of other investigators, Alejandro Dominguez is the main man behind this YouTube-based paranormal investigation series. Dominguez cites a ghostly encounter at the age of five as the inspiration for his interest in the afterlife. As a result, every first and third Tuesday of the month, he and his team of ghostbusters search for the dead in super-creepy locales. Fully shot by Dominguez, the videos allegedly capture apparitions and unexplained activity in places like abandoned schools and the Waverly Hills Sanatorium.
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