Some glide through the dark abyss of the ocean depths while others hang from trees in dark jungle canopies. Some sport enormous eyes while others have horned flesh or bubble gum pink skin. Some skirt the line between gorgeous and terrifying, and all are absolutely fascinating. These are twenty-nine of the most incredibly and real weird animals on Earth:

Not only does this Japanese facial-tissue commercial make no sense as an ad -- what does that tomato/unicorn baby have against wiping itself? -- it's also, supposedly, cursed. Like earlier "viral" videos that would get passed around on VHS, this curse comes with an isolating twist: Watch the video by yourself at midnight (in your respective time zone, of course), and the video changes to a distorted, satanic-looking mess with a pair of black eyes that stare back at you.
One of the most bizarre rodents, populating the deserts of East Africa, is the naked mole-rat. Famed as the longest living rodent in the world, this wrinkly mole rat has a life span of 30 years. With two yellow buck teeth protruding from a pale, hairless body, the mammal may not be an eye-pleaser, but it has an alluring longevity-related adaptation that has gripped researchers in recent years: It seems to be immune to cancer.
Here’s a fun fact about the maned wolf: it is not a type of wolf, and it may look like a fox, but it’s not really a fox. It is, however, the largest of all canids or the mammals of the dog family. It is also the sole species under the genus Chrysocyon. The maned wolf is best known for its relatively long limbs and long russet-colored coat. The maned wolf wanders in the wild and is usually found in Peru, Argentina, and Brazil among others.
While innocently minding her own business and posing for a vacation picture at a Japanese burial ground, this little Canadian girl appears to have awoken what some think is the spirit of a dismembered Samurai warrior. The dad who took the photo, which was then posted to reddit by his friend, claims that no one else was around he snapped the photo—or, so he thought...
The goblin shark is, without a doubt, one of the weird ocean animals that looks more like the predators from the thriller shark movies. This living fossil sports a protruding nose or stout to detect its prey. Along with its unique and extendable jaw that appears to unhinge when feeding, the overall appearance of the goblin shark is both fascinating and terrifying at the same time.
Sadly, in the wild, axolotls are on the brink of extinction. They’re found only in local waterways near Mexico City, where urbanization and water pollution have exacted a toll on their population numbers. Compounding these environmental hazards are nonnative fish species such as Asian carp and African tilapia, which eat juvenile axolotls. These amphibians, which are popular in home aquariums, can be nearly black, chocolate brown, golden, cream colored, speckled or piebald.
Kiwa hirsuta, which has been nicknamed the yeti crab (for obvious reasons), is a crustacean that was discovered back in 2005 900 miles south of Easter Island at a depth of 2,300 meters. Although there isn't a great deal of information on these curious animals, they seem to dwell around deep sea hydrothermal vents. As you can see, their pincers are covered with blond, hair-like strands. It transpires that these hairs are riddled with bacteria, which some believe may serve as a food source for the crustacean. 
A headless goddamned ghost appears right in goddamned front of them. You literally see it materialize on camera -- of all the entries on this list, this is the one you absolutely have to watch (here's a shorter version that cuts right to the ghost if you don't have 4 free minutes). Seriously, your mind will be blown like Eric Stoltz's penis in The Rules of Attraction. As they swing the camera lazily through the room, the ghost just walks very purposefully toward them like it's delivering a pizza, while a long, low moan emanates from its phantom lungs.

This isopod crustacean — from the same group as pill bugs — must be one of the most stomach churning of all parasites. These tongue eaters are a huge pest in global fish farms; however, on coral reefs divers can sometimes spot them in an unusual place: the mouths of anemonefishes. All that’s usually visible of this sinister parasite in the anemonefish’s open mouth are the beady, black eyes set on a white head in the place you’d expect the tongue to be. Initially, the parasite grub crawls through the fish’s gills and attaches to the tongue.
“These small geckos are native to Madagascar. Other leaf-tailed geckos of the genus Uroplatus share a similar flattened tail, but the satanic leaf-tailed gecko has arguably the most leaf-like tail when compared to congeners. This is a fairly old photo, but proves that you can take nice photos with relatively cheap cameras. This was only a 3.2 megapixel Nikon Coolpix 3700…well before I had begun shooting with a DSLR.” – Mike Martin
Here’s a fun fact about the maned wolf: it is not a type of wolf, and it may look like a fox, but it’s not really a fox. It is, however, the largest of all canids or the mammals of the dog family. It is also the sole species under the genus Chrysocyon. The maned wolf is best known for its relatively long limbs and long russet-colored coat. The maned wolf wanders in the wild and is usually found in Peru, Argentina, and Brazil among others.
FYI: Bearded pigs use their scruff to dig around for roots, fungus, and bugs to eat. They also snarf down plants, small birds, and the occasional orangutan carcass. (It’s a pain getting the gristle out of your beard, though.) For more chuckles, steal a line or two from these animal jokes that will have everyone in your office howling. *No pun intended.*
A group of Japanese teenagers are in a restaurant and complain about an offending smell that manifests just as a pale figure appears in the background. Later, on the subway tracks, they smell the offending odor again and see the strange woman across the tracks who kills herself by jumping in front of the train, then staring down one of the men who has to crouch because of the overpowering smell. This video is actually a segment from a 2008 Japanese found footage horror anthology movie called Ura Horror. This isn't the only segment that's broken out from the show and blown up on creepy YouTube; after the mini-ghost-story, watch the exploding sea creature and the capture of a human soul escaping the body. 
Once there, they start feeding. They also begin absorbing their mobility features and gills. The eyes and notochord (like a spine) go next. Finally, the brain is absorbed. Having no need to move about anymore, all of these body parts are considered superfluous by nature and dispensed with (an intriguing indicator that eyes and brains are necessarily mainly for reasons of mobility and are unnecessary for stationary organisms like plants—no wonder many of us feel an urge to travel). The material is then recycled to create whole new body systems, including digestive, reproductive, and circulatory systems. Then the hermaphroditic tunicate reproduces, expelling brand new sea squirts into the world. It doesn’t get much more alien than that.
Known for the peculiar frill around its neck, this lizard is largely arboreal, spending majority of its time in the trees. When the lizard is frightened, it produces a startling deimatic display: it gapes its mouth, exposing a bright pink or yellow lining; it spreads out its frill, displaying bright orange and red scales; raises its body; and sometimes holds its tail above its body. This reaction is used for territorial displays, to discourage predators, and during courtship.
Chances are when you first see this film it doesn’t play as an ad for EDM, and it ended up providing inspiration for some of the 2000s most disturbing horror. The “Big Brain” character in the rebooted The Hills Have Eyes looks a lot like Rubber Johnny and in January 2006, the Showtime anthology series Masters of Horror aired and episode called the “Fair-Haired Child” about a young girl who was kidnapped and kept in a basement with a scarily deformed child... named Johnny.
This two-man British crew is about all things real and true, as they spend their time revealing ghosts caught on tape and exploring real ghost stories. They focus their work on just about every possible entity from the afterlife, including ghosts, demons and poltergeists while visiting haunted UK locations, including abandoned churches and graveyards. 
It’s nearly Halloween, and it would be silly not to discuss some of the world’s most famous ghost sightings and actual video encounters. As I’m writing this, I’ve already been out and done my fair share of research. Which is great for you because what I have to show you will quite frankly have you looking over your shoulder for the next few weeks and sleeping with one eye open.
The Yeti crab is a recently discovered animal which lives in the South Pacific Ocean. The Yeti crab looks like it’s always wearing the bright yellow crab-mittens its grandmother gave it for Christmas one year. It’s roughly 15 cm long and its pincers contain bacteria which it can use to clean the water around its body. It usually eats green algae and small shrimp.
There are about 8.7 million species, that we know of anyway, on planet Earth. With so many animals, it’s likely you haven’t kept track of each and every one. We all know about lions, tigers, and bears (oh my!), but when you really dig deeper, you might be surprised by the strange animals roaming around out there in the wild. From weird looking amphibians to pokey mammals, the sheer amount of diversity in the animal kingdom is pretty amazing! Curious to see what oddball beasts we found? Here are 25 Bizarre Animals You Didn’t Know Exist.
A group of Japanese teenagers are in a restaurant and complain about an offending smell that manifests just as a pale figure appears in the background. Later, on the subway tracks, they smell the offending odor again and see the strange woman across the tracks who kills herself by jumping in front of the train, then staring down one of the men who has to crouch because of the overpowering smell. This video is actually a segment from a 2008 Japanese found footage horror anthology movie called Ura Horror. This isn't the only segment that's broken out from the show and blown up on creepy YouTube; after the mini-ghost-story, watch the exploding sea creature and the capture of a human soul escaping the body. 
The yeti crab (Kiwa hirsuta), an unusual, hairy crab with no eyes, was discovered in 2005 on a hydrothermal vent near Easter Island. This decapod, which is approximately 15 cm long, is notable for the quantity of silky blond setae (resembling fur) covering its pereiopods (thoracic legs, including claws). Its discoverers dubbed it the “yeti lobster” or “yeti crab”.
You might be surprised to learn that this beautiful sea critter (also known as a sea swallow or blue dragon) is actually a sea slug. The blue and silvery mollusk is known to feed off cnidarians like the venomous Portuguese Man o' War. What makes these gorgeous slugs even more fascinating is their practice of storing the cnidarians's stinging nematocysts within its own tissues — ensuring a painful sting to anyone who messes with it.
​Galeopterus variegatus, also named Sunda Colugo or the Sunda Flying Lemur, is a nocturnal and arboreal (lives in trees) mammal endemic to Indochina and Sundaland. These animals possess large membranes of skin called patagiums that extend along the limbs, allowing them to glide along distances of up to around 100 meters; given that these animals are only around 40 centimeters in length that's pretty impressive skills! The mottled coloring of these animals also makes them look a bit like the lichen of a tree and therefore helps to camouflage them. 
Blobfish, pangolin, and flower mantis are just a few of the names of the bizarre bugs and animals that readers will learn about in this fascinating nonfiction title. Through vibrant images and photos, informational text, a glossary of terms, and an index, readers will learn some of the strange ways that arthropods, invertebrates, and mammals have adapted over time to camouflage themselves and develop interesting ways to keep predators away.
From the side, this mole only looks a bit odd, but seen head-on, it can be quite startling. It is considered by numerous people to be incredibly ugly with its odd tentacle-like nose. In reality, the 11 pairs of appendages on the snout are quite amazing. They contain over 25,000 sensory receptors which are called Eimer’s organs. This is the critter’s main sensory apparatus, and it is so fine-tuned that scientists believe it can detect seismic waves. There’s nothing really ugly about the star-nose mole. It’s just different, and its own weird way, quite cute.

The long, thin jaw of the gharial may appear quite frightening to many folks, but have no fear — it's an adaptation developed in response to the creature's fish-heavy diet. Sadly, the global population numbers for this critically endangered Indian crocodile are currently estimated at less than 235 individuals, due to loss of river habitat, depletion of food sources and fishing nets.
The goblin shark is, without a doubt, one of the weird ocean animals that looks more like the predators from the thriller shark movies. This living fossil sports a protruding nose or stout to detect its prey. Along with its unique and extendable jaw that appears to unhinge when feeding, the overall appearance of the goblin shark is both fascinating and terrifying at the same time.
One of the most bizarre rodents, populating the deserts of East Africa, is the naked mole-rat. Famed as the longest living rodent in the world, this wrinkly mole rat has a life span of 30 years. With two yellow buck teeth protruding from a pale, hairless body, the mammal may not be an eye-pleaser, but it has an alluring longevity-related adaptation that has gripped researchers in recent years: It seems to be immune to cancer.
“The leaf-tailed geckos are native to Madagascar and are renowned for their camouflage. This individual is just a juvenile. Many of the leaf-tailed gecko species press their bodies against wooden limbs and trunks during the daytime, and their flattened bodies, fringes, and tails eliminate any shadow, making them invisible to predators. At night, they become active and hunt primarily invertebrate prey.” – Mike Martin
×