Right away this video is suspicious just from the description -- a ghost hanging around the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland? That's a fake haunted house. Why would any realm-shambling specter waste its time in a place where people are expecting to see automated rocking chairs and Muppets dressed up like phantoms? It just seems like that would be super boring.
All madness aside, what really made the Stanley Hotel famous was when author Stephen King actually lived at the hotel for a time and had his own ghostly experience. King reported seeing a faint ghostly figure at the top of the stairs one night before bed. It was this mysterious sighting he witnessed, that inspired King’s movie The Shining. The hotel now runs the film version of “The Shining” on a continuous loop to the guest televisions.
All madness aside, what really made the Stanley Hotel famous was when author Stephen King actually lived at the hotel for a time and had his own ghostly experience. King reported seeing a faint ghostly figure at the top of the stairs one night before bed. It was this mysterious sighting he witnessed, that inspired King’s movie The Shining. The hotel now runs the film version of “The Shining” on a continuous loop to the guest televisions.
This one is not so exciting to look at, but it totally wins the bizarre animal contest. It is colloquially known as a “sea squirt.” This is a sea critter that eats its own brain. A marine invertebrate, it spends part of its life in a larval stage where it can swim around in the water much like a fish or any other mobile animal. This is a relatively brief period in the sea squirt’s life. They cannot feed in this stage, so they swim off, find a nice little bit of seabed to settle in on, and then plant themselves.
This grotesque looking creature is the Aye- Aye, native to the island of Madagascar. These creatures are nocturnal i.e. they only come out at night. Aye-ayes spend their lives in rain forest trees and avoid coming down to earth. They have long witch-like fingers that help them grab small insects and grubs from tree trunks. These animals may not look like primates at first, but they are related to chimpanzees, apes, and even humans. Many locals regard the aye -aye as an omen of ill luck. For this reason they have often been killed on sight. Such hunting has made the aye-aye critically endangered, but thankfully they are protected by law.
These animals, known as sea pigs, are in fact a type of sea cucumber. Sea pigs are found in the deepest abyssal depths of the world’s oceans, as far as 3.7 miles under the ocean surface. They are known to eat bits of decaying plant and animal material found in deep sea mud, but are awfully fond of food that has recently fallen from the ocean’s surface, like a whale corpse!
Just as the Cleveland Museum of Art was preparing for the special Monet exhibit Painting The Modern Garden: From Monet to Matisse, the museum's director of architecture and design snapped this spooky photo of a mysterious figure looking down on the gallery. The "ghost" had an uncanny resemblance to the French Impressionist painter himself, and Kelly Notaro, communications associate for the museum told TODAY that "this snapshot taken by a staff member is not retouched or photoshopped, and we've heard from others that they've seen the man." Talk about a unique way to launch an exhibit.
Despite its ferocious demeanor, the fangtooth measures a little more than 6 inches in length as an adult. Juveniles and adults look so much different that in the 1800s they were thought to be distinct species. Juveniles are found as shallow as 150 feet, migrating into the depths as they mature. It is believed that males are parasitic of females and attach permanently onto them to fertilize the eggs.
While innocently minding her own business and posing for a vacation picture at a Japanese burial ground, this little Canadian girl appears to have awoken what some think is the spirit of a dismembered Samurai warrior. The dad who took the photo, which was then posted to reddit by his friend, claims that no one else was around he snapped the photo—or, so he thought...
Which one of these bizarre creatures and critters are you meeting for the first time? Discover animal kingdom oddballs that 500px photographers have captured for you, with jaw-dropping features that range from wide cartoon-ish eyes to extremely long limbs and snouts to exaggerated body parts that look downright scary. Plus, you’ll get the story behind each of these photographers’ wild encounters. Scroll down!
Sometimes referred to as vampire sharks, these creatures don’t like being exposed to sunlight. They aren’t often seen and so some people believe they are very low in numbers. Because of its distorted and disfigured appearance, some people assume this is some type of species that has been born with genetic concerns or that has been mangled by another creature living in the water. Given the depths at which it lives, the goblin shark poses no danger to humans but it might as well be on the endangered list due to few sightings of the shark.
Just as the Cleveland Museum of Art was preparing for the special Monet exhibit Painting The Modern Garden: From Monet to Matisse, the museum's director of architecture and design snapped this spooky photo of a mysterious figure looking down on the gallery. The "ghost" had an uncanny resemblance to the French Impressionist painter himself, and Kelly Notaro, communications associate for the museum told TODAY that "this snapshot taken by a staff member is not retouched or photoshopped, and we've heard from others that they've seen the man." Talk about a unique way to launch an exhibit.
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