Anyone with a handheld and a dose of curiosity can launch a ghost hunting web series. But it takes authentic footage, top-notch paranormal equipment, and truly chilling results to yield anything other than an eye roll. With endless pages of supernatural investigators out there, the hunt for the good ones can be daunting. So we did it for you and found the best of the best. Here are the best ghost hunters on YouTube that deliver solid scares. 
This is the kind of creature that came straight out of your nightmare to suck your soul out! But this deep sea fish lives in depths which have little or no light penetration at all. Because of this, their eyes are adapted to recognize even the slightest shadows in the water. Believe it or not, these creatures have the ability to create a light of their own through a phenomenon known as bioluminescence and sometimes they can actually adjust the level of light below them to match the surface light, which makes them practically invisible! Scary indeed!
Most of us don’t grasp the variety of animals species that inhabit the Earth today, and some even get surprised as they find out there’s an animal they haven’t heard of before. But seriously now – out of 1,367,555[1] identified non-insect animal species that live on Earth today, how do you expect to know every single one of them? To put it into perspective, take into account that this number represents only 1% of all animal species that ever lived!

We can truthfully say that our list comprises of some of the rarest and weirdest animals there are. Take, for example, the Glaucus Atlanticus – an aquatic animal who looks like a Pokemon monster and has a name as equally anime. Or the absolutely stunning, yet very unusual animal called Okapi, that looks something like a cross between a moose and a zebra but is actually related to a giraffe. Or even the rare animal called Goblin shark, who looks like it soaked in a bath for too long, making it one of the scariest sea creatures.
In this news video, a child appears to be haunted by a duppy, a malevolent spirit of Caribbean origin. While the boy in the video claims the duppy is the spirit of a friend, it behaves violently toward him, pushing and pulling him in different directions. Some people have written off the video as a fake, but watching the boy's movements carefully, especially in the second attack, shows him flailing and kicking in ways that don't look like acting. Without follow-up, we don't know whether the spirit ever left him alone or if he continued to be haunted - we're left only with the lasting image of a young boy tormented by a violent duppy.

Surely at this point our ghost hunters are propelling themselves the hell out of that school on pants-shredding jets of crimson-tinged fear diarrhea. Except they aren't. In fact, they have no reaction at all, and they continue scouring in the haunted building for another two boring minutes until the clip ends. (At least the "moaning" isn't coming from the ghost -- it's the beginning of a call to prayer in a neighboring mosque. You hear the service continue throughout the rest of the video.)


A headless goddamned ghost appears right in goddamned front of them. You literally see it materialize on camera -- of all the entries on this list, this is the one you absolutely have to watch (here's a shorter version that cuts right to the ghost if you don't have 4 free minutes). Seriously, your mind will be blown like Eric Stoltz's penis in The Rules of Attraction. As they swing the camera lazily through the room, the ghost just walks very purposefully toward them like it's delivering a pizza, while a long, low moan emanates from its phantom lungs.
Known for the peculiar frill around its neck, this lizard is largely arboreal, spending majority of its time in the trees. When the lizard is frightened, it produces a startling deimatic display: it gapes its mouth, exposing a bright pink or yellow lining; it spreads out its frill, displaying bright orange and red scales; raises its body; and sometimes holds its tail above its body. This reaction is used for territorial displays, to discourage predators, and during courtship.
Watch through Blair Witch vision as some poor soul gets hopelessly lost in the subterranean stone tunnels of the Paris catacombs, and listen to him get more frightened as he speeds up his winding path (like he's being chased?) before the camera cuts out (was it dropped?). Then we hear the man either run off or get sucked into the spirit world. You watch and decide... if you're not claustrophobic, that is.
Photo: 25. NOAA (Public Domain), 24. By Aaron Logan, Lightmatter gerenuk, CC BY 1.0, 23. Laika ac from USA, Laika ac Deep sea creatures (7472073020), CC BY-SA 2.0, 22. Nisamanee wanmoon, ปลาเปคู (Pacu), CC BY-SA 4.0, 21. gailhampshire via flickr. CC BY 2.0, 20. charlene mcbride via flickr. CC BY 2.0, 19. Camilousuga, Umbonia spinosa (Bicho espino), CC BY-SA 4.0, 18. Rein Ketelaars, Red-lipped Bat fish, CC BY-SA 2.0, 17. Imtorn, Glaucus atlant., CC BY-SA 3.0, 16. Ash Bowie, Silkmoth, CC BY-SA 3.0, 15. Frank Vassen, Lowland Streaked Tenrec, Mantadia, Madagascar, CC BY 2.0, 14. Navinder Singh, Saiga tartarica, CC BY-SA 4.0, 13. Bree McGhee via flickr. CC BY 2.0, 12. Dianne Bray / Museum Victoria, Mistukurina owstoni museum victoria – head detail, CC BY 3.0 AU, 11. Karthickbala at ta.wikipedia, Nasikabatrachus sahyadrensis, CC BY-SA 3.0, 10. Raul654, Okapi2, CC BY-SA 3.0, 9. Ba’Gamnan at en.wikipedia, Hummingbird Hawk-moth, CC BY-SA 2.5, 8. Wikipedia Commons.com (Public Domain), 7. Tobias von Anhalt, Atretochoana eiselti, CC BY-SA 3.0, 6. Keven Law from Los Angeles, USA, Jaguarondi portrait, CC BY-SA 2.0, 5. Pixabay.com (Public Domain), 4. Bäras, Thornydevil, CC BY-SA 3.0, 3. Nhobgood, Parrotfish turquoisse, CC BY-SA 3.0, 2. Wikipedia Commons.com (Public Domain), 1. Original: cliff1066™, Pink Fairy Armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus) (cropped), CC BY 3.0
Known for the peculiar frill around its neck, this lizard is largely arboreal, spending majority of its time in the trees. When the lizard is frightened, it produces a startling deimatic display: it gapes its mouth, exposing a bright pink or yellow lining; it spreads out its frill, displaying bright orange and red scales; raises its body; and sometimes holds its tail above its body. This reaction is used for territorial displays, to discourage predators, and during courtship.

The Mutillidae are a family of more than 3,000 species of wasps (despite the names) whose wingless females resemble large, hairy ants. Found in Chile, they are known for their extremely painful stings, hence the common name cow killer or cow ant. Black and white specimens are sometimes known as panda ants due to their hair coloration resembling that of the Chinese giant panda. (Image credits: Chris Lukhaup)

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