Photo: 25. NOAA (Public Domain), 24. By Aaron Logan, Lightmatter gerenuk, CC BY 1.0, 23. Laika ac from USA, Laika ac Deep sea creatures (7472073020), CC BY-SA 2.0, 22. Nisamanee wanmoon, ปลาเปคู (Pacu), CC BY-SA 4.0, 21. gailhampshire via flickr. CC BY 2.0, 20. charlene mcbride via flickr. CC BY 2.0, 19. Camilousuga, Umbonia spinosa (Bicho espino), CC BY-SA 4.0, 18. Rein Ketelaars, Red-lipped Bat fish, CC BY-SA 2.0, 17. Imtorn, Glaucus atlant., CC BY-SA 3.0, 16. Ash Bowie, Silkmoth, CC BY-SA 3.0, 15. Frank Vassen, Lowland Streaked Tenrec, Mantadia, Madagascar, CC BY 2.0, 14. Navinder Singh, Saiga tartarica, CC BY-SA 4.0, 13. Bree McGhee via flickr. CC BY 2.0, 12. Dianne Bray / Museum Victoria, Mistukurina owstoni museum victoria – head detail, CC BY 3.0 AU, 11. Karthickbala at ta.wikipedia, Nasikabatrachus sahyadrensis, CC BY-SA 3.0, 10. Raul654, Okapi2, CC BY-SA 3.0, 9. Ba’Gamnan at en.wikipedia, Hummingbird Hawk-moth, CC BY-SA 2.5, 8. Wikipedia Commons.com (Public Domain), 7. Tobias von Anhalt, Atretochoana eiselti, CC BY-SA 3.0, 6. Keven Law from Los Angeles, USA, Jaguarondi portrait, CC BY-SA 2.0, 5. Pixabay.com (Public Domain), 4. Bäras, Thornydevil, CC BY-SA 3.0, 3. Nhobgood, Parrotfish turquoisse, CC BY-SA 3.0, 2. Wikipedia Commons.com (Public Domain), 1. Original: cliff1066™, Pink Fairy Armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus) (cropped), CC BY 3.0
Surely at this point our ghost hunters are propelling themselves the hell out of that school on pants-shredding jets of crimson-tinged fear diarrhea. Except they aren't. In fact, they have no reaction at all, and they continue scouring in the haunted building for another two boring minutes until the clip ends. (At least the "moaning" isn't coming from the ghost -- it's the beginning of a call to prayer in a neighboring mosque. You hear the service continue throughout the rest of the video.)

Unlike most jellyfish, Stygiomedusa gigantea actually has no tentacles — only four “arms” that hang down like wavy curtains. This deep-sea jellyfish has arms that can reach 30 feet in length and also function as extensions of the mouth. Although they do not sting, they are believed to capture and trap plankton and small fish. Stygiomedusa gigantea has been sighted only about 100 times in the past 118 years.
There are 18 different species of octopus within the genus Grimpoteuthis which are commonly referred to as a “Dumbo octopuses” due to their characteristic ear-like fins that make them resemble Disney’s Dumbo. These enigmatic cephalopods are a pretty rare sight since they usually dwell in deep waters ranging from 400 meters to 4,800 meters, but the few times they have been spotted has revealed that they usually eat crustaceans and worms. They’ve also been observed around deep sea hydrothermal vents, which are areas on the sea floor where hot and mineral rich fluids spew out due to volcanic activity.
It’s been nearly a decade since it was first uploaded, but “I Feel Fantastic” is still only a little less mysterious than when it first captured the attention of the internet. The featured robot, Tara the Android, is the creation of an robot hobbyist who calls himself "John Bergeron." The plan was for Tara to be the first android pop star, but the bizarre description on the YouTube upload that references Pygmalion and a cutaway from I Feel Fantastic to an outdoor location gave birth to several online urban legends. Is Tara a harmless pop star, or a robot built in the image of a murder victim?
New York City actor Joe Cummings made this video capturing what appears to be a homeless woman who secretly lived in his house for an indeterminate amount of time. As recently as July of last year, Joe continued to insist this really happened and is not a prank or joke. There was never another product or release that tried to market itself off this video, so chances are he's telling the truth, which makes it so much creepier. What if there's someone peeing in your sink at home right now? You don't know.
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Just last week, divers in the Solomon Islands discovered a glowing sea turtle under the waves. While other animals are known to be bioluminescent, this is the first documented case of a glowing reptile in the wild. According to diver David Gruber, an associate professor of biology at Baruch College, the hawksbill sea turtle’s shell glowed both red and green, but it’s likely that the red came from biofluorescent algae.


I was dreading going to see these donkeys. Thought it was going to be a smelly, hot farm! How wrong was I?? We absolutely loved this visit. The guide was very knowledgable and made the tour great fun! The highlight of the visit was obviously the baby donkeys, they were so friendly and cute. The history and science part of the tour was equally enjoyable and informative . The visit was great value for money and definately worth a visit!

If an anteater and an armadillo had a baby, it might look something like the pangolin, an odd-looking mammal found throughout parts of Asia and Africa. The pangolin has a long, specially adapted tongue for eating ants and termites and wears a protective keratin shell — it is the only mammal known to have this adaptation. Sadly, its unique characteristics also make it the most trafficked mammal in the world, as it is highly sought-after for its meat and armor. The pangolin is currently listed as a threatened species.
I wasn't going to include this video. Then my girlfriend walked by and saw the first frame of it on my screen and yelled, "What the hell is that? That's not spiders, is it?" I cocked an eyebrow at her, which was enough to make her run away, repeating, "Nope." If it helps, I'll remind you that daddy longlegs spiders aren't poisonous. They only make these fuzzy patches because they have such long legs and single-segment bodies. Just don't touch anything that looks like human hair when you're in the wild -- unless you're really into spiders.

This video, uploaded by British water company United Utilities in April 2011, showed three clips of a maintenance robot running across some sort of creature in the sewers under the St. James neighborhood of London. The internet population quickly began wondering if this was some sort of genetic experiment or just an escaped monkey before someone put together that it was April and United Utilities had a “What Not To Flush” campaign running to educate people about proper sewer usage. Yeah, a water company pulled a viral April Fools' Joke that’s still circulated as legitimate. It only lives on because of how creepy it it.
“The babirusas (from Indonesian b?b? r?sa, lit. “deer-hog”) are a genus, Babyrousa, in the pig family (Suidae) found in Wallacea, or specifically the Indonesian islands of Sulawesi, Togian, Sula and Buru. All members of this genus were considered part of a single species until 2002, the babirusa, B. babyrussa, but following the split into several species, this scientific name is restricted to the Buru babirusa from Buru and Sula, whereas the best-known species, the north Sulawesi babirusa, is named B. celebensis. If a babirusa does not grind its tusks (achievable through regular activity), they will eventually keep growing so as to penetrate the animal’s own skull.” – Syahrul Ramadan
Make no mistake — those tree trunks seen above are not saplings. That's right, those crabs are huge! Growing up to a meter in length from leg to leg, these terrestrial hermit crabs are the largest land-living arthropods in the world. Although they are omnivores that have been known to consume turtle hatchlings, they generally prefer to eat fleshy fruits and, you guessed it, coconuts!
A self-described ghost hunter from Texas who has worked with dozen of other investigators, Alejandro Dominguez is the main man behind this YouTube-based paranormal investigation series. Dominguez cites a ghostly encounter at the age of five as the inspiration for his interest in the afterlife. As a result, every first and third Tuesday of the month, he and his team of ghostbusters search for the dead in super-creepy locales. Fully shot by Dominguez, the videos allegedly capture apparitions and unexplained activity in places like abandoned schools and the Waverly Hills Sanatorium.
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