Known for its luscious red lips!, the red lipped batfish is native to the waters of Galapagos Islands. Ironically, it’s a bad swimmer and uses its highly-adapted pectoral fins to walk on the ocean floor. Some scientist believe the purpose of its red bright lip is for the male to attract the female. Yes its the male with the red lips! This fish lives in tropical climates and on the depth range of 3 to 76 meters below sea level and poses no threat as such.
A group of Japanese teenagers are in a restaurant and complain about an offending smell that manifests just as a pale figure appears in the background. Later, on the subway tracks, they smell the offending odor again and see the strange woman across the tracks who kills herself by jumping in front of the train, then staring down one of the men who has to crouch because of the overpowering smell. This video is actually a segment from a 2008 Japanese found footage horror anthology movie called Ura Horror. This isn't the only segment that's broken out from the show and blown up on creepy YouTube; after the mini-ghost-story, watch the exploding sea creature and the capture of a human soul escaping the body. 
It’s been nearly a decade since it was first uploaded, but “I Feel Fantastic” is still only a little less mysterious than when it first captured the attention of the internet. The featured robot, Tara the Android, is the creation of an robot hobbyist who calls himself "John Bergeron." The plan was for Tara to be the first android pop star, but the bizarre description on the YouTube upload that references Pygmalion and a cutaway from I Feel Fantastic to an outdoor location gave birth to several online urban legends. Is Tara a harmless pop star, or a robot built in the image of a murder victim?
Kiwa hirsuta, which has been nicknamed the yeti crab (for obvious reasons), is a crustacean that was discovered back in 2005 900 miles south of Easter Island at a depth of 2,300 meters. Although there isn't a great deal of information on these curious animals, they seem to dwell around deep sea hydrothermal vents. As you can see, their pincers are covered with blond, hair-like strands. It transpires that these hairs are riddled with bacteria, which some believe may serve as a food source for the crustacean. 
All madness aside, what really made the Stanley Hotel famous was when author Stephen King actually lived at the hotel for a time and had his own ghostly experience. King reported seeing a faint ghostly figure at the top of the stairs one night before bed. It was this mysterious sighting he witnessed, that inspired King’s movie The Shining. The hotel now runs the film version of “The Shining” on a continuous loop to the guest televisions.
The Star Nosed Mole must have jumped straight out of a Bugs Bunny cartoon. It looks as if its head just got blown up, an effect made even more realistic by the pink tentacles stretched out on its nose. This weird creature is found in Canada and in the north-eastern part of the US. The name comes from its strange nose (which is more like a squished octopus attached to its face than a nose). The tentacles on the nose help the mole find snails, molluscs, worms, and other small creatures it likes to eat. They probably see it coming and die laughing, allowing the mole to simply walk up and gobble them up.

“The babirusas (from Indonesian b?b? r?sa, lit. “deer-hog”) are a genus, Babyrousa, in the pig family (Suidae) found in Wallacea, or specifically the Indonesian islands of Sulawesi, Togian, Sula and Buru. All members of this genus were considered part of a single species until 2002, the babirusa, B. babyrussa, but following the split into several species, this scientific name is restricted to the Buru babirusa from Buru and Sula, whereas the best-known species, the north Sulawesi babirusa, is named B. celebensis. If a babirusa does not grind its tusks (achievable through regular activity), they will eventually keep growing so as to penetrate the animal’s own skull.” – Syahrul Ramadan
Also known as the Thorny Devil, this lizard has a body covered with thousands of spikes. These spikes are thought to make predators think twice before attempting to swallow a thorny devil. Not only does their spiny armor protect them from predators, it also helps them absorb water in their arid habitat. There are hygroscopic (moisure-attracting) grooves between their thorns. They obtain water from the dew that condenses on their bodies overnight, during rare rainfalls, or by brushing up against dew-coated grass. Any water that gets into the grooves between its thorns is drawn by capillary action to its mouth, allowing the thorny dragon to suck water from all over its body.

Pet owners know the eerie feeling of seeing your cat or dog watch something you can't see, and this dog owner put their pet's extra senses to the test. Captured in 2008, the footage starts off with radio interference and an orb, but gets substantially weirder. A door opens and shuts on its own, a roll of paper towels goes flying, and the dogs bark and retreat from something behind where the camera is sitting. It's a freaky scene, one that's not easily explained by camera tricks.
Pet owners know the eerie feeling of seeing your cat or dog watch something you can't see, and this dog owner put their pet's extra senses to the test. Captured in 2008, the footage starts off with radio interference and an orb, but gets substantially weirder. A door opens and shuts on its own, a roll of paper towels goes flying, and the dogs bark and retreat from something behind where the camera is sitting. It's a freaky scene, one that's not easily explained by camera tricks.
And the light from the "angel" has a strange weight to it -- you can see it pulse outward at the bottom as it suddenly gains mass after striking the ground. Anyway, maybe a Pixar animator got bored and threw this together just to mess with people. After contacting all of his or her friends in Jakarta, Indonesia, to stage it. Including, of course, his or her friends with access to the security footage of that particular public square.
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Skip the Ryan Reynolds remake. The original Amityville, which stars James Brolin and Margot Kidder as a couple who move into a house with a violent history, is the first movie based on the real-life Amityville horror. That chilling true story? In 1975, the Lutz family moved into a house in Amityville, Long Island, where a man had murdered six members of his family a year earlier. They moved out just a month later, claiming that they’d been plagued by paranormal activity.
A group of Japanese teenagers are in a restaurant and complain about an offending smell that manifests just as a pale figure appears in the background. Later, on the subway tracks, they smell the offending odor again and see the strange woman across the tracks who kills herself by jumping in front of the train, then staring down one of the men who has to crouch because of the overpowering smell. This video is actually a segment from a 2008 Japanese found footage horror anthology movie called Ura Horror. This isn't the only segment that's broken out from the show and blown up on creepy YouTube; after the mini-ghost-story, watch the exploding sea creature and the capture of a human soul escaping the body. 
“The Trump administration can take the wind out of the sails of anti-fossil arguments, and give judges far less reason to block projects like Keystone XL in the future if it rescinds the EPA’s GHG “Endangerment Finding.”FACT CHECK:The Trump administration recently released the National Climate Assessment which outlines the dire consequences of anthropogenic global warming in detail.
Lakes are already lurking with scary things, like catfish and smelly algae. But when Kim Davidson was splashing around with her and her pal's three kids in a lake, they never thought in a million years that they would come in contact with something this creepy. After the photo was taken, Kim immediately consulted paranormal experts to find out who the extra kid in the picture was. The experts believe it to be the ghost of a girl named Doreen O'Sullivan, who drowned in that very spot in 1913. Don't know about you, but we'll be swimming in pools from now on.
Yes, you heard correctly, there is an animal called a sarcastic fringehead, and no- it's not just an English person with bangs. These crazy creatures (Neoclinus blanchardi) are found in the Pacific ocean off the coast of North America. Under normal circumstances they don't like to flash the goods, but when threatened they open their huge colorful mouths and show off some sharp teeth as a sign that you don't mess with these bad boys. 

The Star Nosed Mole must have jumped straight out of a Bugs Bunny cartoon. It looks as if its head just got blown up, an effect made even more realistic by the pink tentacles stretched out on its nose. This weird creature is found in Canada and in the north-eastern part of the US. The name comes from its strange nose (which is more like a squished octopus attached to its face than a nose). The tentacles on the nose help the mole find snails, molluscs, worms, and other small creatures it likes to eat. They probably see it coming and die laughing, allowing the mole to simply walk up and gobble them up.
These creepy ghost recordings offer compelling existence for spirits. Some are malevolent, some are indifferent, and each one is an interesting peek into what might be happening beyond our realm of experience. Though some people might explain away these images because of camera tricks, digital manipulation, or other explanations for each anomaly, there's no way to prove these scary ghosts caught on video aren't real. These ghosts caught on tape will thrill and chill even the most hardened skeptic.
Chrysomallon squamiferum is found around inhospitable Indian Ocean hydrothermal vents, extreme ecosystems in 8,000 feet of water. Water temps can reach over 700°F, and biological communities sprout up where the salt water and extreme heat interact. Here, armored snails use iron sulfide to build their shells — the only animals on Earth to use iron in this way. Black metallic scales also cover the foot.

Rachelle Cracchiolo started the company with a friend and fellow teacher. Both were eager to share their ideas and passion for education with other classroom leaders. What began as a hobby, selling lesson plans to local stores, became a part-time job after a full day of teaching, and eventually blossomed into Teacher Created Materials. The story continued in 2004 with the launch of Shell Education and the introduction of professional resources and classroom application books designed to support Teacher Created Materials curriculum resources. Today, Teacher Created Materials and Shell Education are two of the most recognized names in educational publishing around the world.


New York City actor Joe Cummings made this video capturing what appears to be a homeless woman who secretly lived in his house for an indeterminate amount of time. As recently as July of last year, Joe continued to insist this really happened and is not a prank or joke. There was never another product or release that tried to market itself off this video, so chances are he's telling the truth, which makes it so much creepier. What if there's someone peeing in your sink at home right now? You don't know.
“These small geckos are native to Madagascar. Other leaf-tailed geckos of the genus Uroplatus share a similar flattened tail, but the satanic leaf-tailed gecko has arguably the most leaf-like tail when compared to congeners. This is a fairly old photo, but proves that you can take nice photos with relatively cheap cameras. This was only a 3.2 megapixel Nikon Coolpix 3700…well before I had begun shooting with a DSLR.” – Mike Martin

Chances are when you first see this film it doesn’t play as an ad for EDM, and it ended up providing inspiration for some of the 2000s most disturbing horror. The “Big Brain” character in the rebooted The Hills Have Eyes looks a lot like Rubber Johnny and in January 2006, the Showtime anthology series Masters of Horror aired and episode called the “Fair-Haired Child” about a young girl who was kidnapped and kept in a basement with a scarily deformed child... named Johnny.
When they hatch, they quickly infect other local anemonefishes. Parasites, by definition, don’t aspire to kill their host. After all, if the host dies, the parasite loses its home and food source. However, in the case of the tongue-eating louse, some individuals can grow to be so large that the hapless anemonefish struggles to close its mouth. Eventually, as you might imagine, this hinders the host’s ability to eat.
While their distribution is very limited, this is not the only reason why it took scientists so long to discover them. These frogs spend the majority of their lives underground, only to surface two weeks every year for mating purposes. They don’t even need to come up for food; they are able to live on a diet of the food that exists underground, which is mainly termites. These frogs also look as strange as they sound. They always seem like they are bloated, or look like they have had a little too much to eat. They have a very small head in comparison to their body, and have a white snout that sticks out from their face. And, as I am sure you can guess, they have smooth deep purple skin.
To celebrate their first year in university, six friends went camping in the wilderness. After driving for several hours from the nearest town, they discovered a lagoon, nestled beside a cliff ideal for diving. They set up camp in the woods nearby and spent the evening swimming in the warm, clear water. As the sun sunk below the trees, one of the friends went up to the highest point on the cliff and jumped off, while the other 5 watched. Their laughter slowly subsided as they waited for him to surface. It only took half a minute for them to dive in after their friend. Struggling and sputtering among the reeds in the lagoon, they searched hopelessly for him. Finally they disentangled themselves and came up, but they never saw their friend again. Heartbroken they returned to the city and passed a strange and lonely year in which their only solace was the knowledge that they would return to the lagoon to honor the anniversary of their friend’s death.
I always beg for them to give him one last chance. Of course, they did at first. Charlie has been back home several times, each shorter in duration than the last. Every time without fail, it all starts again. The neighbourhood cats with gouged out eyes showing up in his toy chest, my dad’s razors found dropped on the baby slide in the park across the street, mom’s vitamins replaced by bits of dishwasher tablets. My parents are hesitant now, using “last chances” sparingly. They say his disorder makes him charming, makes it easy for him to fake normalcy, and to trick the doctors who care for him into thinking he is ready for rehabilitation. That I will just have to put up with my boredom if it means staying safe from him.

If an anteater and an armadillo had a baby, it might look something like the pangolin, an odd-looking mammal found throughout parts of Asia and Africa. The pangolin has a long, specially adapted tongue for eating ants and termites and wears a protective keratin shell — it is the only mammal known to have this adaptation. Sadly, its unique characteristics also make it the most trafficked mammal in the world, as it is highly sought-after for its meat and armor. The pangolin is currently listed as a threatened species.


For instance, in 2015 researchers identified a ruby-red sea dragon off the coast of Australia, a new species of giant tortoise in the Galápagos Islands and an ancient spikey worm with 30 legs in China. As these newfound creatures are uncovered, it's important to protect them from pollution, habitat loss and the havoc caused by invasive species, especially as Earth enters its sixth mass extinction, experts say.
You probably recognize these two from television. Ghost Hunters airs Wednesdays on Syfy; Ghost Adventures, Saturdays on the Travel Channel. But their YouTube channels are worth checking out for your streaming scares. Their YouTube channels are great ways to revisit past investigations, even sometimes including silly behind the scenes extras and fan interactions. 
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